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problems that get thrust upon them as a consequence of diminished tax bases and the consequence of housing, the significant portion of the public and their states that are in most need. we're committed to having a third phase of the so-called big deal on the budget. we're of the view that just as it took during the clinton administration, it didn't happen in one fell swoop to get our economy in great shape and move toward a balanced bump started off with three phases. started with president bush's actions, the first president bush, in terms of taxation, before president clinton took office. then the actions the president took in '94 and then in '97. well, we think there's a third phase here that can set our country on a path that will allow us to get our debt, the gdp, our deficit to gdp, down around 3%, which is the basis of which all economists left, right, center, agree, are the areas which we really can begin to grow as a country. and also my grandfather used to say, with the grace of god and good will of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail between now and the time we deal with th
, what you tax and so on are very difficult and contentious decisions that will take some time to address. >> well, those is to use -- those issues of course are not the specific purdy of the fed, and so why do we shift gears and talk more specifically about some things that the fed is doing and things that the fed might do. perhaps a way to introduce that is to say that the fed of course is keeping interest rates at close to zero since roughly 2008, and it dug pretty deep into its arsenal, more recently in terms of in particular the very massive asset purchases recently launched its third round, which are intended to bring long-term interest rates. can you tell us how well you think that is working? >> so, to go back just one step, as you said we have brought the short-term interest rate down almost to zero, and for many, many years monetary policy just in bald moving the short-term, basically overnight interest-rate up and down and hoping that the rest of the interest rates would move in sympathy. then we had a situation in 2008 where we are brought the short-term rate down about as far
here and also include fundamental tax reform that raise revenue. and raised quite a bit of revenue, 2.4 trillion of that 5.4 trillion would have been revenue, but revenue not required raising rates, but revenue that would come through reforming the tax code, reducing preferences, exclusions that are shot through the tax code, to actually be able to reduce rates and raise additional revenue. for anybody that wanted can you really do that, remember tax expenditures are running $1.2 trillion a year. we are spending more for the tax code than we are through all of the appropriate accounts of the federal government. this is what happens to the deficit in the share of gdp under the fiscal commission plan. you can see a dramatic improvement. the fiscal cliff plan, and what was just adopted, you all know the elements here, individual rates were raised, capital gains and dividend rates were raised, the estate tax was increased to 40% above $5 million. alternative minimum tax was six on a permanent basis paper extended other expiring tax provisions. on the spending side, a doc fix was taken car
government, directs tax dollars to specific industries was a discussion in last night's presidential debate, and it's become an important and ongoing theme in the current presidential campaign. the term on which washington assisted the finance and auto industries have also been the focus of intense debate, but probably the most contentious example of all is the one on which diana furchtgott-roth, manhattan institute senior fellow, and our speaker this afternoon, focuses in her time and important new book, "regulating to disaster: how green jobs are damaging america's economy." in it, she subjects the assumption and policies which led to such a faded federal investments as solyndra solar panel manufacture as was that a 123 collector car battery manufacture to a waiting analysis which we of the institute have come to expect from this oxford trained economist who served as chief of staff for the council of economic advisers. sorry. during the administration of president george w. bush. in her book, she helps us understand why the failures of such direct investments in private firms are both s
it was put in place. we just raise tax rates on the well-off so we are doing this in pieces off. declaring victory more angry at each other than they were before and making it harder to do the remaining policies is so we know what we have left we know what we have to the health care cost which the truth is we don't know how to fix the system in its entirety. we have to keep looking at ways to control health care cost and the government programs and medicare and we are going to have to go back and do this every couple of years but we have to study what works and put more of the policies that are working in place. we have to deal with our other entitlement. it's a contentious issue in this country. it's always a political tough battle. but the longer we wait to make the changes for the people the difference of the programs there is no question about that and we have to go forward with tax reform which is great when you talk about it broadly we all know the tax code is a disaster and none of us like the tax code. when you talk about the ability to broaden the base, lower the rate and raise re
. >> not the last question. >> i'm sorry, francine. [inaudible] >> everything you run out of tax reform process has been out with a has to measure to make them maybe not impossible, but much less likely to tax reform goes forward this year. is that basically what you believe? if you could say a word about why tax reform should go forward. what do you see as the upside of that? >> i'm not saying that. what i'm saying is they think we took seems that do not package they have some ramifications tax reform. but i am not saying that we shouldn't sit down and talk about how we look at our tax structure and how we reform it. it's a fact that by what we thought it, but it isn't anything close to the whole package. i think what it does is to force people to be more concrete about what they mean when they took about tax reform. let me just give you an example. some of the provisions that we have been training and retraining, some of them are in appropriation and some of them are in the tax structure. i think we can take a hard look at all of our training programs. some of them aren't about to taxation. i thi
authority is necessary. but there are some others. >> guest: some other examples. let's take corporate tax. it seems likely there will be a year long debate about corporate taxation here in washington in 2013. most businesses are global in some respect. not all but most big businesses for sure. if you're a big business and you look over to champion you'll -- over to china, you'll see promises to have 15% corporate income tax rate. you come the united states, you have no predictable, don't know what it is, and the current rate is much, much higher than that. we need reforms that say to businesses, we want you to invest here in the united states. while we're having this big debate about corporate tax reform, let's include in it specific reforms for the energy sector that in fact are designed to attract a maximum amount of new investment to build a clean energy platform let's have it by a subpart of the corporate tax reform debate. another example? the carbon tax. the carbon tax is a broad-based tax that does not in fact have to have a big impact on consumers. it could be placed on electric u
and said it much better than i will, in fact, maybe if you had it on tape, we'd show it. but tax policy and trade policy. obviously, as the recession hits the world, why, trade policy gets more difficult. and we have troubles getting products into two of our most fast-growing markets, in argentina and brazil, which we could use some government help on keeping those markets open. and, of course, the big one is tax policy. we have the highest corporate tax rate in the world. so that mark barker who is now the ceo of the company and for a young whippersnapper of 55, he's doing a great job, but that he sits every year when he sets the budget, and he has to decide where the last dollar of investment goes. and where it generates the last dollar of profit. so he could get a dollar of profit in the united states for which 60 cents goes out to the shareholder, to the ultimate shareholder. or he can get another dollar, he can get that dollar profit in timbuktu of which 75 cents comes to the average shareholder. so any global company can maneuver around it, procter & gamble does that, i'm sure, be
virginia and articulated the perspective on increasing taxes but we shouldn't do that. you know what obama said three days after especially when we disagree? he said eric, i1 coming you lost. then about a week later he says i want the folks that got us into this mess to do the whole lot less talking and a lot more listening. you know, you can talk of little bit but i want you on the sidelines while we try to clean this up for you. unbelievable. gone with any notion of unifying the country, of bringing us together. instead, they're came this steady mantra of the attack and vilify the other side. no ideas. it wasn't an idea base. just like his 2008 campaign for president wasn't idea based. was hope and change, glorious pieces with no substance whatsoever to the only substance is he was going to unify us committee the post partisan president. and yet almost immediately, it was conservatives are hostage-takers. they are the enemy. they care only about millionaires and billionaires and not children with autism and down syndrome. now, what was this approach? why did obama and his administration
that? is there enough tax generated in the economy to offset that? and would disaster occurs are you on the hook for off infrastructure and everything else that may be required to rebuild that community? and asia return on that exposure -- is your return greater? as a taxpayer, the answer is unfortunately too often know. we have subsidize risks to the point where as long as no extreme event occurs, it seems okay. but when the extreme event occurs, you are now exposed to much greater costs without necessary generating revenue or other societal benefits off that risk. now, during the '70s and '80s and through the early '90s, went a lot of growth was taking place in coastal areas and other vulnerable areas, very few storms were occurring. frequency was down. so the allusion was i have lived here for 30 years, this never happens. welcome the problem with climate whether it's 30 year cycles are like an eyelash in understanding how big systems and dynamics work. not talking at any of the forcing issues, and now we find ourselves in this period of increased activity and you are sitting on t
disposable income, exactly the kind of customers who bought for your stores and your tax base in the city. joe cortright also based in portland has done a lot of research into what that means and he took walk square based in seattle. raise your hand if you know about box score. most of you. reteach address in the world. i guess it's america. google maps data in terms of its workability. so joe cortright did a study and found it depends with 50 year reign, but every point is worth on average added 100 about $2000. every point on a 100-point scale figures in d.c. an empty lot is worth $200,000. people are paying more for these places. the premium for walkable housing versus drivable housing is about 50% in seattle, 150% of denver, 200%. the exact same footage rather than outside the city. seemed true for office rents. not the same ratios. in the d.c. area inside the beltway have jumped to 27% higher than the best office outside the city. so more and more people want this and they want to pay for it if your city has set for them. but the other great discussion called portland's workability d
that we find ourselves in a place of sort of catastrophic outcomes, taxes and the livestock impact this year. so what does it take? it takes focusing event but it takes having had an event and the use of the window of that event to plan and engage the public and leadership at the same time. but as don and margaret and treachery are also saying, it's also supporting our collaboration and -- between research and management that puts information into practice on an ongoing basis. the last thing that you require in the case of it is to put out a research project and some comes back three years later with the paper and said you had a drought. which is usually how it operates. so we can't borrow one watch to tell them the time but it has to be much more active in terms of a collaborative framework between research and management. that being said, we also know the things that we should be doing. luc pointed out too many of them, and the very same things we as people do during a drought is what we asked them to do before a drought, on water efficiency, conservatism, it's one. why is that c
economy and to provide a larger tax base. common sense immigration reform is an important way to address tour changing demographics -- our changing demographics as an aging society. look at me, you'll understand that. we can't harvest our food, care for our sick or sustain our military without immigrants and temporary workers. our current work visa laws contain arbitrary caps that have absolutely no connection to what's happening in the real world. there are very serious limits in scope and difficulty in implementation in these current rules. surely we can do better. in fact, we have to do better if we're going to have the workers we need. what we need is this: a lawful, rational and workable immigration system that secures our borders, provides the workers we need at all skill levels and protects the rights of citizens both undocumented and those legally pursuing citizenship. we believe immigration reform should include the following interrelated components: we must secure our borders and enable people and commerce to flow efficiently and lawfully in and out of our country. we've made s
not put the administration and the good life. the comment attributed to him was we shall tax and tax, spend and spend and elect any left. whether true or not, of course he denied it come is stuck with him the rest of his slaves and became a rallying cry for those who heeded this about in new deal. and if that wasn't enough, if cameron 1839, when moore broke in europe, harry found himself back at the mayo clinic and the doctors had ruled out a recurrence of cancer, but they couldn't figure out why he was unable to solar nature since. said they came up with a dog's breakfast of intravenous feeding, the transfusions, injections of liver extract, a combination which he had mr. t. had off and on for the rest of his life and sometimes it works and sometimes it didn't. but for the rest of his life, he was unable to gain weight. his digestive system alluded to the.is to figure out. his digestive system is a mess. sometimes the verge of starvation. so spring 1940, before he moved into the white house, he was at his house in georgetown on industry, a rented house with his daughter, diana. he w
attributed to him was, we shall tax and tax, spend and spend. whether true or not of course he denied it. it stuck with him for the rest of his life, and it became a rallying cry for those who hated the roosevelt and the new deal. and if that wasn't enough, in september 1939 when the war broke out in europe, harry found himself back at the mayo clinic. and the doctors had ruled out recovering cancer but they couldn't figure out why he was unable to absorb nutrients. so they came up with intravenous feedings, blood transfusions, injection of liver extract, a combination which he had administered to him off and on for the rest of his life. and sometimes it worked and sometimes it didn't. but for the rest of his life, he was unable to gain weight. his digestive system, i'll leave it to the doctors to figure it out, his digestive system was a mess. sometimes he was on the verge of starvation. so in the spring of 1940, before he moved into the white house, just before, he was at his little house in georgetown on industry, and -- in street, a rented house with his daughter diana, still recover
a voluntary check off on their income tax return. we do these kinds of things in florida, florida power and light company has others i am sure subscribe to it to help people who can't meet their needs to be it would be a good test run to see and then in future disasters we would have an opportunity to know what exactly, how many people really are mindful, never were -- never mind the work climate change. you tell me if something is wrong with this disaster and houston texas has more snow than chicago and illinois. something is upside down in many respects. chairman sessions, you and others on the rules of the committee and mr. bishop i believe on one occasion have heard me argue that we need to do exactly what the japanese government does. they know that they are going to have earthquakes and in light of that what they have done is established inside of their diet a specific committee that deals disasters so that you can move it hurriedly. we have this process. i have seen it good and bad in this regard, or katrina, the initiative that came out with a failure of initiative. we did, howe
represents the values and priorities of the public and the decisions being made about what to spend and tax and someone, they are very difficult and contentious decisions that take time to address. >> , those issues, of course, are not the specific purview and why don't we shift gears and talk more explicitly about some of the things that the fed is doing and things that the fed might do. perhaps a way to introduce that is to say that that is in keeping interest rates close to zero, since it has dug pretty deep into an unconventional policy. asset purchases are meant to help in the short term. can you explain that? >> well, monetary policy involved the overnight interest rate up and down and hoping that the rest of the interest rates would move in sympathy. then we get a situation in 2008 where we had dropped the short-term rate down about as far as it could go come almost entirely to zero. so the question is what work did the fed do. there are many people a decade ago event a lot of articles about how the fed would be out of ammunition if they got down to zero. a lot of work by academics a
is a border state with taxes. too often, cities have borders with the rio, texas that we also have my city on the southeast part of the state and it's a strategic location. my city the city of 670,000 people. it's a big city. the metropolitan area sharing the space which has two cities, our neighbors in another city, which is my city. there is no doubt that the main concern of the people in the border areas on the mexican side is the demand for safety and the demand for security. this demand is being heard louder and louder than the demands for employment and secret services, which is what we mayors do. when i was listening of course for job creation, economic development. but i mexico, it's becoming also one of the major necessities, which was than in the past, but is now. the fact that a strategic security knowledge and something, which in the past, we never had to do it, which we security issues, which would strategy, which was this alliance that needs to be built at the federal government, drug enforcement agencies, now becomes a necessity. i think that there are models that can work a
estate tax. they made a boiling, surging noise exactly as a steamboat it. he enjoyed racing eggs in his handkerchief and dipping them in this brings with it with soft boil in two minutes or hard boiled and four, depending upon his mood. sawyer loves the hot mist. the fresh bottles of dark beer were cold. in his 32 years, sawyer had been a torch boy. in new york fire and engine company number 14, and in san francisco had run and battle fire for broaddrick one under chief broader, the city's first volunteer fire company and first fire chief. solar serve with other engine houses and toiled as a steamboat engineer flying the mexican sea trade. twain, who held strong opinions, worked up when sawyer mentioned he had worked as a steamboat -- steamboat engineer. the journalist caution any bold boy who dreamed of shipping as a steamer fireman, such a job he said knowingly, has little drawbacks. the boarding steam room he pointed out the suffocating temperature of the furnace room where the engineers stand in a narrow space between two rows of furnaces, which glared like the fires of hell. he sho
is the moment forget last, which is why when you tax or the supreme court can't think of a religiously doable and what you need to get done. those three don't all line up and you can't lose this moment in time because you eventually get supreme court you're going to get this too. the most important things you need from law enforcement community is about unchecked, limitation on the assault clips. so that to me, plus i would also do a soul fans. he focused on not because he's the three through to the supreme court, not just congress. i will say the cops program passed under bill clinton, which put 100,000 community policing is a program scaled back. steve having designed the program, close to three years and how they keep that on the program. [inaudible] >> every city except chicago. >> to add to that, how do you keep the national dialogue going? how is it not just become a kind of street fight in the house of representatives and the nra? >> i'm not sure you're going to avoid a fight. when you see this coming to talk about where you grew up. there is a difference between the city of chicago, s
'd rather not go there. you take, what'd you say -- >> 480, cash money. >> no background checks. >> no tax, no charges. there you go. >> because i couldn't pass one. >> five. >> okay. you're sure no background check. i don't think i can pass one. >> get it out the door, and it's yours. >> okay. >> with we're not a dealer. this is a private party sale. >> well, good, because i probably couldn't pass one. >> i don't think i could either. >> that's good about the background check, because i probably couldn't pass one. >> i don't care. >> only thing i do is demand you show me your license. >> you don't care about the background check, right? >> no. >> all right. >> no. because i wouldn't pass either, bud. >> so no background check, right? >> right. >> good, because i probably couldn't pass one. no background check. >> no. >> all right, good. i probably couldn't pass one. [laughter] one of those things, you know? >> i hear ya, yeah. >> all right. >> let's do it. >> no background check because -- >> you get the idea. now, what they did was -- can you get my powerpoint back? thanks. they did some
islamist terrorist, they can't be the west by blowing us up but they will have two use use the taxes that the soviets use against us in 1930s and 40s. in fact as you go on the msha and i would challenge you that, google with the left said about challenges to the infiltration of islamic terrorism into america. what what you find his is ridiculed. you will recall when several members of congress raised the issue of hillary clinton's top aides mullah of the dean having islamic connections and that in fact told me that you cannot even get the question of infiltration by islamic7 terrorism into american institutions passed and we are basically saying yes in the time of alger hiss. comments? >> anti-communism was considered rude, prudish, disrespect double and facts members of the rotary for example would raise that point. national view -- -- national review was anti-communist. >> there were differences i would say and one is that the case was made during the 1930s and 1940s certainly that communism was good for america and we have this wonderful ally in uncle joe stalin. you can't make
to consider as part of this is expanding the multiple sales tax in ways along the southwest border stay with firearms so we can also have hopeful sales on assault weapons and other concerning long guns. the second policy recommendation is you really need to enact an effective firearms to version our trafficking statute. the two most commonly used, even though there is close to 40 different statutes available to atf and making gun trafficking cases come in the two most common statutes used or engaged in the business of selling firearms without a license or falsifying the atf form 4473. both are very difficult to prove. for example in the kern report, he would have been those investigations were atf agents what if some are investigating teaching and dealing that advice and violation, only viewable to church and 38% the cases. also find the 4473 farm, only boat to charge that important% of the cases because they were very difficult prove in the instance that engage in the business of the firearms license, you could stand to sell it if a private rocket for my collection, passing him on but
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